404 500 arrow-leftarrow-rightattachbutton-agriculturebutton-businessbutton-interestcalendarcaretclockcommentscrossdew-point external-linkfacebook-footerfacebookfollow hearthumidity linkedin-footerlinkedinmenupagination-leftpagination-right pin-outlinepinrainfall replysearchsharesoil ticktwitter-footertwitterupload weather-clearweather-cloudyweather-drizzleweather-fogweather-hailweather-overcastweather-partly-cloudyweather-rainweather-snowweather-thunderstormweather-windywind

Have your say on oversized road regulations

Heavy vehicle regulation across Australia is complex, inconsistent and threatens to place a handbrake on our burgeoning farm sector.

Larger, more efficient farm vehicles and machines play an important part in keeping Australia’s farmers competitive. Being able to move this equipment between properties is fundamental to the business of farming.

Currently, the rules governing farmers’ road access vary between states and even local government areas. Often, rules fail to strike a suitable balance between road safety and industry productivity.

Impeding the movement of farm vehicles has a direct impact on food and fibre production. Farmers can miss a sowing window or lose a crop while waiting for a permit to move equipment.

The last thing any farmer would want is to cause harm to another member of their community on the road. That’s why we fully support all reasonable steps to ensure equipment is moved safely, and driven responsibly.

The Solution

In September this year, the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) released an Issues Paper on national road access laws for agricultural machinery.

The issues paper clearly outlines the problem: that current regulations do not take into account the nature of the agricultural fleet, nor the quick decisions farmers need to make when managing crops.

To reduce red tape and improve clarity, the state governments that have signed up to the National Heavy Vehicle Law (Queensland, NSW, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania) have committed to developing a single agricultural notice, replacing the previous 14 different state notices.

Having a single national notice would improve both compliance and road safety.

But this outcome isn’t a given, farmers need to make their voice heard.

How you can help

You can help support fit-for-purpose road regulations that let our farmers get on with the business of growing the world’s best food and fibre.

Together, let's support a better framework for moving farm machinery. One that: reduces red tape; boosts productivity; and creates safer roads for everyone.

Click your State or Territory below to send an email

  • Tags

1 Responses

    I would like to see Eyre Peninsula (SA) given our own machinery movement zone as currently we are compared to the Barossa Valley with movement rules which is like chalk and cheese. Eyre Peninsula is a grain growing area that is totally surrounded by pastoral country. We farm much larger parcels of land for most of EP due to low rainfall so our movement of machinery is greatly increased in distance. The topography of EP is also a factor that needs to be considered. The Risk Assessment for places like the Barossa Valley is vastly different to the Risk Assessment for Eyre Peninsula, yet we are all in Zone 4 currently and lumped into Region 5 for the new zoning. If the proposed piloting requirements are accepted, this will greatly affect the productivity of many EP farmers. We will need to employ more workers in order to comply. These parameters proposed are just not necessary in most areas of EP and will really burden our farmers. Or...... I guess we'll just 'run the gauntlet' like we always do and if that's the case this long drawn out process has been a total failure. But that seems to be the attitude of regulators of late, beating their chest over their supposed 'fabulous consultation process' and 'outcome targets', but ultimately forcing farmers to break the law as usual. This whole process via state and now national regulators has totally lost the goodwill of farmers. And if we are forced to apply for 'extra' permits in order to keep someone in a job....well... you may just have civil disobedience on your hands. WE ARE OVER IT!

5 ways every Australian can get involved on AgDay

News

5 ways every Australian can get involved on AgDay

18 November 2017 - AustralianFarmers

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
SA Upper House ignores science and curtails farmers' fortunes

News

SA Upper House ignores science and curtails farmers' fortunes

17 November 2017 - National Farmers' Federation

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Soil and water: a national priority

News

Soil and water: a national priority

16 November 2017 - SoilsForLife

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Forum

Interview with David Westbrook

05 October 2017 - Unknown

  • 0
  • 0