404 500 arrow-leftarrow-rightattachbutton-agriculturebutton-businessbutton-interestcalendarcaretclockcommentscrossdew-point external-linkfacebook-footerfacebookfollow hearthumidity linkedin-footerlinkedinmenupagination-leftpagination-right pin-outlinepinrainfall replysearchsharesoil ticktwitter-footertwitterupload weather-clearweather-cloudyweather-drizzleweather-fogweather-hailweather-overcastweather-partly-cloudyweather-rainweather-snowweather-thunderstormweather-windywind

Q fever is the livestock industry’s million dollar problem

The livestock industry loses 1,700 weeks in productivity each year and millions of dollars across the supply chain due to a lack of understanding around Q fever, a new campaign being run by Victoria’s peak farmer group will show.

The Victorian Farmers Federation Livestock Group is set to launch an awareness campaign hitting home the seriousness of Q Fever as a drain on the livestock supply chain.

The $100,000 campaign includes industry workshops, preparedness toolkits and targeted advertising to promote the dangers of Q fever and the importance of vaccination.

“Q fever is carried by cattle, sheep, goats, feral animals and rodents, and can be transmitted to humans,” VFF Livestock President Leonard Vallance said.

“It affects farmers, farm employees, shearers, animal carriers, abattoir workers, meat inspectors and vets, so if you work with livestock right across the supply chain, you are at risk of getting Q fever.”

Mr Vallance said Q fever was a massive issue with around 600 cases reported across Australia each year, which cost industry millions of dollars annually in lost productivity, medical costs and other expenses.

“Q fever costs the meat industry alone at least $ 1 million every year, and when you add that up across all the livestock industries, it’s pretty significant and really underscores the importance of getting your employees vaccinated,” he said.

“The vaccine is 96-98 per cent effective for cases vaccinated during incubation and totally effective when it’s not, so it’s a one-off expense that becomes a worthy investment when you consider the lost productivity, health problems, and potential legal issues you risk if you don’t get your staff inoculated.”

Mr Vallance encouraged livestock industry employers to come to VFF run events and do their part to minimise the risks of contracting Q fever by staying on top of the latest information about the disease.

“This campaign will give the whole supply chain an opportunity to improve their knowledge of Q fever and how they could be affected if they aren’t vaccinated to safeguard against lost productivity and economic issues,” he said.

“But it’s also up to employers to make the effort to read the fact sheets and come to our seminars to learn just how destructive the disease can be to the livestock industry.”

The facts about Q Fever - #bqfeveraware

If you work on a farm, transporting animals or in an abattoir, you could come into contact with Q Fever every day.
Leonard Vallance, VFF Livestock President

  • Tags

0 Responses

Royal Commission to tune up the farm-bank relationship

Blog

Royal Commission to tune up the farm-bank relationship

National Farmers' Federation President, Fiona Simson, says for farmers, the Royal Commission into th...

22 June 2018 - Fiona Simson, President, NFF

  • 0
  • 0
  • 2
Who is working on the farm?

News

Who is working on the farm?

21 June 2018 - Kimberly Pearsall

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
US forest model could show the way for Australia

News

US forest model could show the way for Australia

21 June 2018 - Aust Forest Products Assoc

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0