404 500 arrow-leftarrow-rightattachbutton-agriculturebutton-businessbutton-interestcalendarcaretclockcommentscrossdew-point external-linkfacebook-footerfacebookfollow hearthumidity linkedin-footerlinkedinmenupagination-leftpagination-right pin-outlinepinrainfall replysearchsharesoil ticktwitter-footertwitterupload weather-clearweather-cloudyweather-drizzleweather-fogweather-hailweather-overcastweather-partly-cloudyweather-rainweather-snowweather-thunderstormweather-windywind

Food provenance revealed as business rolls out new labelling

Laws requiring the new Country of Origin Labelling (CoOL) passed Parliament a week ago.

A favourite for Canberra foodies, Pialligo Estate is one of the first businesses to adopt new labelling showing consumers exactly where their food comes from.

Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister, Luke Hartsuyker visited the Canberra restaurant and said he hoped more businesses would take Pialligo Estate’s lead and introduce the labels before it became mandatory in 16 months’ time.

“Australians want to know where their food was made or packed, and how much was sourced from Australian farmers. It is great to see businesses around the country telling them just that,” Minister Hartsuyker said.

“A significant piece of legislation supporting the CoOL changes, the Competition and Consumer Amendment (Country of Origin) Bill 2016, passed through the Senate last week, meaning businesses can roll out the new labels with greater confidence.

Senator for the ACT, Zed Seselja also took time out to check out the new labelling at Pialligo Estate.

“The changes make it clear imported goods cannot be claimed to be made in Australia just because their form or appearance has been changed during local manufacturing.”

Senator Seselja said consumers should start noticing more products in supermarkets carry the new labelling system.

“We are already seeing food products such as BCP blueberries, Carmen’s original fruit-free muesli and Farmdale milk displaying new country of origin labels in our supermarkets,” Senator Seselja said.

“The new labels make it easy for consumers to see if—and how much of—their food is Australian and make more informed decisions about the food and other products they buy.

“Australian produce has a reputation of being high-quality, clean and green, and consumers have a right to know what they are paying for.

“It’s a system that’s good for Australian consumers—and it’s good for Australian farmers.”

There is an online tool available to help businesses identify appropriate labels for their products.

The tool and a range of other information and support for business can be found at business.gov.au/foodlabels or by calling the contact centre on 13 28 46.

Find out more about the benefits of the new labelling requirements for Aussie farmers here.

  • Tags

0 Responses

SOTA saved in education cuts reversal

News

SOTA saved in education cuts reversal

12 January 2018 - WAFarmers

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Virtual reality to increase kids' salmon smarts

News

Virtual reality to increase kids' salmon smarts

10 January 2018 - AustralianFarmers

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Farmers for Free Trade: The Cairns Group Farm Leaders

Blog

Farmers for Free Trade: The Cairns Group Farm Leaders

The Cairns Group Farm Leaders took a leadership role, demanding action at the World Trade Organizati...

15 December 2017 - Scott Kompo-Harms, NFF

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Forum

What is grown? Where? How?

07 December 2017 - Clement DEMARAIS

  • 0
  • 0