404 500 arrow-leftarrow-rightattachbutton-agriculturebutton-businessbutton-interestcalendarcaretclockcommentscrossdew-point external-linkfacebook-footerfacebookfollow hearthumidity linkedin-footerlinkedinmenupagination-leftpagination-right pin-outlinepinrainfall replysearchsharesoil ticktwitter-footertwitterupload weather-clearweather-cloudyweather-drizzleweather-fogweather-hailweather-overcastweather-partly-cloudyweather-rainweather-snowweather-thunderstormweather-windywind

Pimelea research - the power of people and collaboration

Over the last 12 months, Pimelea cattle poisoning has moved from a call for action from the Begonia field day to a research project co-funded with producer and industry dollars.

The project pathway has required passion, cash and in-kind commitment from affected producers and a collaborative network from industry, livestock agents, researchers, regional council and government extension staff.

Dry summers followed by winter rain triggers seasonal abundance of Pimelea. Three species of this native, toxic, herbaceous plant are toxic to cattle causing St George Disease or Marree Disease. Symptoms include severe diarrhoea, reduced body condition, swelling under the jaw, brisket and belly; breathing difficulties and death. It is one of the cruellest wasting diseases of cattle. Mental well-being and financial losses of affected producers are at stake, including lost opportunity to graze pastures interspersed with toxic Pimelea plants.

Clinical signs of Pimelea poisoning including fluid swelling, in the jaw, brisket and belly.

Pimelea abundance may become more frequent if climate variability results in more droughts, winter rain and pasture rundown across inland Australia.

Governments and industry research development corporations are turning more towards co-investment models to maximise adoption of new R&D as the available pool of research dollars continue to shrink. The role AgForce played in advancing Pimelea research was pulling together a group of grass roots producers, industry and community representatives with a common interest in future research and development for solutions to this toxic native plant.

There is scope to consider this innovative direct funding model for other R&D situations. Together we can work towards solutions and enabling research to become a reality.

Have you experienced Pimelea poisoning at your place? Log in and tell us your experience in the comments section.

  • Tags

0 Responses

Sugar – we're making more and eating less

Blog

Sugar – we're making more and eating less

As an economist, I like numbers. So during the debate about a sugar tax, I've been collecting some n...

13 April 2018 - Warren Males, CANEGROWERS

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Climate Outlook: May to June 2018

Blog

Climate Outlook: May to June 2018

Parts of Victoria and Tasmania are set for a wetter and warmer few months, according to the Bureau o...

13 April 2018 - AustralianFarmers

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
Stop the Basin Basher motion

Campaign

Stop the Basin Basher motion

06 April 2018 - AustralianFarmers

  • 1
  • 2
  • 0